Old Wall Street Saying Quote Forex trading quotes ...

Daily Habits that I use to trade order flow

  1. Record News Articles. Then you read through the news articles and save the key phrases,
paragraphs, quotes, etc, that give you insight into the markets expectations, sentiment, global
macro, etc, and then input these input your currency specific master file.

  1. Record Propriety News Impact Releases Method and input into your currency specific file.

  1. Record impact of any other intraday events which were not on calendar which moved the
market and input into the currency specific file using the news impact release method if possible.

  1. Record any key phrases and information released on IFR, forexlive, etc that gives you insights
into market expectations, sentiment, global macro, etc, and input into currency specific file. The
daily recap of the news articles will give you a very nice overview of what happened. However, I
usually like to quickly view the IFR and scroll through the news to see if there was anything
important that was said by an important official, etc. Or if the daily news articles do not give me
sufficient meaning as to why price did what it did for the day, then I can go to IFR to read some
of their explanations to see if I agree with their story and scenarios for the market. Again, any
important information I record it into my currency master files.
  1. Label the stops and option barrier levels on your chart and set price alerts to the two closest
ones – one to the topside and one for the downside. Then once one of those gets triggered, you
just reset the price alert to the next closest stop/barrier level. Check the stop hunting section to
learn how to locate the stops.
  1. Use your currency master file to perform deep scenario analysis.
  2. Create an order flow generator list and trigger sheet. Bullish and Bearish triggers and
generators for each currency / financial instrument. What is the market pricing in. What will
shatter those expectations. I have provided you Order Flow Generators for each currency in
a separate lesson. There can be similarities between the different currencies.
  1. Prepare for next days news. Use your currency master file which should contain the history of
news impacts that you have recorded in order to determine which reports are important and
which ones are meaningless and you should not spend your time on. See the news trading
section for explanations on how to know which news releases are important.
  1. Prepare a Correlation Analysis / Sensitivity Sheet.
  2. Learn about one new order flow generator and/or scenario per day either from forex, or
bonds, futures, stocks, commodities, etc. Can be super simple or complicated mix of
participants.
submitted by Fox-The-Wise to Forex [link] [comments]

Tips From A Lifer

I’ve been reading these posts on an off for quite some time now and it saddened me to see someone had recently posted their “I quit the game” statement. We all walk through fire to stand in the green valley...and the journey has to be made on foot. And alone. And it’s tough.
In response, I wanted to add a list of pointers for people starting out in this insane game and to address what I’ve learned from over a decade of trading Forex. It’s long-ish but it’s based on reality and not a bunch of meaningless retail junk systems and “insider knowledge” by nitwits on YouTube or some 19-year old “whiz kid” who apparently makes ten billion dollars a week with a mystical set-up that’ll only cost you $1,999 to buy!
I became a profitable trader by keeping everything simple. I lost thousands when I started out, but I look back now and realise how easily I could’ve avoided those losses.
Keep Everything Simple.
For the sake of disclosure, I worked for Morgan Stanley for over a decade in fixed income but learned almost everything I know from the forex guys whom I got to know as good friends. They make markets but there’s still a lot to learn from them as a small fry trader. I got into all this as a hobby after annoying the traders with questions, and all these years later it still pays me. There are still occasional nightmare accidents but they’re far rarer to the point where they don’t affect my ROI.
Possibly the most clear statement I could make about Forex trading in the large institutional setting is actually a pretty profound one: Forex traders are not what you think they are: every single forex trader I ever worked with (and who lasted the test of time) had the exact same set of personality traits: 1. NOT ONE of them was a gung-ho high-five loudmouth, 2. Every single one of them analysed their mistakes to the point of obsession, 3. They were bookish and not jocks, 4. They had the humility to admit that many early errors were the result of piss-poor planning. The loudmouths last a year and are gone.
Guys who last 5, 10, 20 years in a major finance house on the trading floor are nothing like the absurd 1980s Hollywood images you see on your tv; they’re the perfect opposite of that stereotype. The absolute best I ever met was a studious Irish-Catholic guy from Boston who was conscientious, helpful, calm, and utterly committed to one thing: learning from every single error of judgement. To quote him: “Losing teaches you far more than winning”.
Enough of that. These points are deliberately broad. Here goes:
  1. Know The Pairs. It amazes me to see countless small account traders speak as though “systems” work across all pairs. They don’t. Trading GBP/CHF is an entirely different beast to trading CHF/JPY. If you don’t know the innate properties of the CHF market or the JPY or the interplay between the AUD and NZD etc then leave them alone until you do. —There’s no rush— Don’t trade pairs until you are clear on what drives ‘commodity currencies’, or what goes on behind currencies which are easily manipulated, or currencies which simply tend to range for months on end instead of having clear trends. Every pair has its own benefits and drawbacks. Google “Tips on trading the JPY” etc etc etc and get to know the personality of these currencies. They’re just products like any other....Would you buy a Honda without knowing a single thing about the brand or its engine or its durability? So why trade a currency you know nothing about?
  2. Indicators are only telling you what you should be able to see in front of you: PRICE AND MARKET STRUCTURE. Take everything off your charts and simply ask one question: What do I see happening right here and right now? What time frame do I see it on? If you can’t spot a simple consolidation, an uptrend, or a downtrend on a quick high-versus-low time frame scan then no indicator on the planet will help you.
  3. Do you know why momentum indicators work on clear trends but are often a complete disaster on ranges? If not, why not? Do you know why such indicators are losing you tons of trades on low TFs? Do you actually understand the simple mathematics of any indicator? If the answer to these questions is “no” then why are you using these things and piling on indicator after indicator after indicator until you have some psychedelic disco on your screen that looks like an intergalactic dogfight in Star Wars? Keep it simple. Know thy indicator.
  4. Risk:Reward Addiction. The greatest profit killer. So you set up your stops and limits at 1:1.5 or whatever and say “That’s me done” only to come back and see that your limit was missed by a soul-crushing 5 pips before reversing trend to cost you $100, $200, $1000. So you say “Ah but the system is fine”. Guys...this isn’t poker; it doesn’t have to be a zero sum game. Get over your 1:1.5 addiction —The Market Does Not Owe You 50 Pips— Which leads to the next point which, frankly, is what has allowed me to make money consistently for my entire trading life...
  5. YOU WILL NEVER GO BROKE TAKING A PROFIT. So you want to take that 50-pip profit in two hours because some analyst says it’ll happen or because your trend lines say it has to happen. You set your 1:1.5 order. “I’ll check where I’m at in an hour” you say. An hour later you see you’re up 18 pips and you feel you’re owed more by now. “If I close this trade now I could be missing out on a stack”. So what?! Here’s an example: I trade in sterling. I was watching GBP climb against it’s post-GDP flop report and once I was up £157 I thought “This is going to start bouncing off resistance all morning and I don’t need the hassle of riding the rollercoaster all day long”. So I closed it, took the £157, went to make breakfast. Came back shortly afterwards and looked at the chart and saw that I could’ve made about £550 if I’d trusted myself. Do I care? Absolutely not...in fact it usually makes me laugh. So I enter another trade, make another quick £40, then another £95. Almost £300 in less than 45 mins and I’m supposed to cry over the £250 I “missed out on”?
£300 in less than an hour for doing nothing more than waiting for some volatility then tapping a keyboard. It’s almost a sin to make money that easily and I don’t “deserve” any of it. Shut off the laptop. Go out for the day.
Does the following sound familiar? “Okay I’m almost at my take-profit...almost!.....almost!....okay it’s bouncing away from me but it’ll come back. Come back, damnit!! Jesus come back to my limit! Ah for F**k’s sakes!! This is complete crap; that trade was almost done! This is rigged! This is worse than poker! This is total BS!!”
So when you were 50% or 75% toward your goal and could see the trade slipping away why wasn’t $100 or $200 enough? You need more than that?...really?!
So point 6:
  1. Tomorrow Is Another Day. Lordy Lordy, you only made $186 all day. What a disaster! Did you lose anything? Nope. Will the market be open again tomorrow? Yep. Does London open in just four hours? Yep. Is the NOK/SGD/EUR whatever still looking shitty? Yep. So let it go- there are endless THOUSANDS of trades you can make in your lifetime and you need to let a small gain be seen for what it is: ANOTHER BEAUTIFUL PROFIT.
Four or five solid but small profits in a day = One Large Profit. I don’t care how I make it, I don’t care if it’s ten lots of £20, I don’t care if I make the lot in a single trade in 30 seconds either. And once I have a nice sum I switch the computer off and leave it the Fk alone. I don’t care if Brexit is due to detonate the pound or if some Fed guy is going to crap all over the USD in his speech; I’ve made my money and I’m out for the day. There will be other speeches, other detonations.
I could get into the entire process by which I trade but it’s aggravatingly basic trend-following mostly based on fundamentals. Losing in this business really does boil down to the same appalling combination of traits that kill most traders: Greed, Impatience, Addiction. Do I trade every day? Absolutely not; if there’s nothing with higher probability trades then I just leave it alone. When I hit my target I’m out for the day- the market doesn’t give a crap about me and I don’t give a crap about the market, if you see my meaning.
I played poker semi-professionally for two years and it’s absolutely soul-destroying to be “cold decked” for a whole week. But every player has to experience it in order to lose the arrogance and the bravado; losing is fine as long as you learn from it. One day you’ll be in a position to fold pocket Kings because you’ll know you’re dead in the water. The currency markets are exactly the same in that one regard: if you learn from the past you’ll know when it’s time to get out of that stupid trade or that stupid “system” that sounded so great when you had a demo account.
Bank a profit. Keep your charts simple. Know the pairs. Be patient. Touch nothing till you understand it inside out.
And if you’re not enjoying the game....STOP PLAYING.
[if people find this helpful I might post a thread on the best books I’ve studied from and why most forex books are utterly repetitious bullshit].
Peace.
submitted by Dave-1066 to Forex [link] [comments]

Don't buy into this rally. Just a warning. Explanation inside. (/Bitcoin/ banned me for posting this)

90% of people are still 90% down.
This market is not going anywhere, anytime soon.
Before you downvote me.... just for angst or hope against getting your money back. Hear me out.
I made 500% gains in January. Got out. Warned everyone. Tether. Manipulation.
I'll buy when the stops are broken and Eth flash crashes to $0.10 again
You have to consider. It's now September. Last November 2017, Roger Ver was calling for BCH to replace BTC within 6 months. Everyone's prospect about this market has been blinding and extreme, and for the most part upside down/misguided.
When its 9 months into 2018, and were every bi-weekly up/down 30% its unjustified for the current centralized system, to invest in a speculative asset that is becoming increasingly more volatile every month. We should be seeing less volatility. The chances now, of ETF's ever happening become presumibly worse. It's dangerous for regulators to also at this point announce an ETF, just for the simple nature that it will create another positive feedback bubble loop.
I don't know where some of you guys find the extra money under the cushions and couches... to catch what is essentially a falling knife.
God speed to you if Eth is $1000 next year... but...
The technicals are so manipulated, flawed, incoherent.
RSI, MACD, Bolingers, near meaningless, and that's whats scaring away everyone.
We've only had 10 years of track history in crypto, so Im hesitant in treating the system with accurate technicals.
The stock market indices have a track history of 100+ years. After time and stability, measurements, certain indicators were introduced. Bollinger Bands, etc. Do these measurements aid in predicting where BTC or your favorite coin is going? In my opinion, no. Now, its MOMO, Social Media, and #Yacht.
Long term, sure... were still up... or anyone that bought in prior to 2017 basically. So, I guess the moving average, over 10 years - is an okay indicator, but wait....
When AMD announced earnings a few weeks ago - they made a bold statement stating their 3rd/4th quarter revenue on GPU's for crypto would be near zero. Which is a very very bearish stance.
These huge price swings are freaking everyone out. Im not gonna use the "T" word yet..... as is the political climate -- and most politicians simply won't come out and say.... Tulip Mania.
The Dutch East India Company was the largest company of its time, valued at $7.1 adjusted for inflation. All because of... spice... opium... and most of all a bubble in tulips.
I'm more inclinced to study a bubble right now, so much so than the individual coins. But, the system as a whole intrigues me. Regardless if it goes up or down.
It's already been concluded that Tether was behind December's bubble. Academics have already proven this. It's pretty settled, like climate science. Going forward, with that conclusion in mind, put yourself in SEC regulators shoes now. There are too many questions, with not enough answers. There is no transparency. The exchanges, and the transfer of USDT is causing havoc in the system. If Bitfinex is the biggest exhcange in the world by volume, and they've basically had zero banking/shady banking since April of 2017, until "the largest exchange in the world" is put in its place - I honestly just have a fatalistic viewpoint on crypto.
Coinbene pulled off the same trickery. Can you explain the BitForex volume on this picture? This is now. How would one explain this to SEC regulators? https://imgur.com/a/SsNQjFW
The majority of the members in this group are going to be long term bullish on cryptocurrency. I cant untangle that or the get quick rich mentality. The goal is to make money, but also to have discussion; on the flaws of the current marketplace. There are no assurances it will go up.
This isn't the stock market.
This isn't even OTC assets. Not saying Bitcoin or Crypto overall will go to zero. I'm only trying to ascertain my perspective, and pass it onto some of the more bullish investors. I have money in, but more or less sitting on sidelines with majority posted gains. I want to atleast share the other side of the mirror.
Unlike previous, crashes, corrections, there are certainly more variables. In the old days, you didn't have this number of alt coins. You didn't have the type of manipulation, social media advocates (Dennis Rodman; Potcoin; John McCafe). You didn't have Tether. You didn't have exchanges locked out by banks. Or government regulations, or China saying no. You definately had exchanges collapse. Back then, people still looked at Bitcoin as a growth opportunities and this futurisitic way of paying for goods. When China backed out, it changed my perception of the future. Also, everyone thought the transfer of Bitcoin would be free. Turned out, thats a big fat lie. That's why the system was basically built.
The banks and governments have crypto by the balls. And when MJ is legalized in the USA, all the PotCoin whales are just going to dump via Eth. (Joking). The only winners right now, are the exchanges (and circa this post Dogecoin). I still have not seen or heard of any winners in the decentralized era. AuraDao was supposed to be that. It's not.
Anyways, Vitalik B. was quoted the other day as saying we'll never see the 1000x folds again in our lifetime.
Meaning, if we invest today in 60 years we won't be Warren Buffet Jr. I think the overall sentiment is, (Im just speaking for the majority of people) is, people saw a technology. Then saw how the technology was exploited. In an unregulated environement. The sentinment is, unregulated currencies are fatally flawed. So, while they might stick around I think Dec 2017 was a one time only. Bitcoin rose to fame like Rhonda Rhousey. Then she lost. Sure, shes still around.. I guess. :P
~$6200'ish is the break even point for mining BTC profitably (across generational AntMiners). Just thought I'd throw that tidbit out there. You might see some strange 'floors' and 'supports' that look unnatural in the coming days.
At thats the bottom line, cause Stone Cold said so. *Glass breaks*
submitted by infectedmethod to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Motivational Post No: 3 - Learning to Become a Successful Trader

Follow up from previous post: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/5s0kamotivational_post_no_2_how_long_did_it_take_to/
Sharing another one I liked, I would pick this one as the best out of the 3 I've posted, this one is educational as well. Anyway, is the formatting alright, anything I can change to make it easier to read this wall of text? Thanks.
POST:
Learning to Become a Successful Trader
The following was posted as a comment by Ziad in reply to a post on Michael Brenke's Blog, but I'm posting it here (with Ziad's permission) because I believe it contains extremely valuable and genuine insights coming from a very disciplined and successful trader. I would also like to include the following quote by Dr.Brett Steenbarger
"Too many traders are looking for setups, when in fact they're the ones being set up."
Hi Michael,
I've been reading your blog for quite a while now but haven't commented yet. However, I feel I need to comment now.
If you don't mind I'm going to be very straight forward, and blunt even, but I hope you'll take it from a spirit of sincerity and genuine desire to help. It's going to be a long comment, so I'm going to break it up into 2 or 3 comments.
Here's the situation as I see it: For the last few months, and possibly much longer, you've just been spinning your wheels while thinking that you are getting somewhere. The reason for this is that you are going about learning how to trade in the wrong way, in my opinion. I say this because I've been trading much less than you, a little over 2 years now, and yet because of the way I went about learning and what I focused on, last year I netted $150k while nearly quintupling my account, without a single losing month, and while only risking a very small portion of my account on any single trade. Now there could be many reasons for the difference in performance, but I think one of the main reasons has to do with what you are focusing on and how you are going about the learning process.
To try to put it as succinctly as possible, in my view traders that are focusing all their attention on "set-ups" and finding out which combinations of indicators work are never going to become profitable. They are trying to follow the advice of trading books that say trading is simple and psychology is everything. So they search for set-ups that 'work', and that can take the guess work out of trading. They want to be "disciplined" and have simple rules that guide all their actions. But there's a few problems with this. Namely, while psychology is HUGE, it's not everything. And while trading is all about simple principles, actually having an edge is NOT simple. It's a myth that you can have a couple simple price or indicator set-ups and make money consistently if only you are disciplined. That's a load of crap. It keeps the dream alive for wannabe traders who never realize what it's truly about. Well let me tell you what it's truly about...
Trading is about being okay with ambiguity. It's about tolerating confusion. It's about sitting with discomfort and being at peace with it. It's about not having an exact script of when to trade or not to trade, or what's really a high odds trade, and being okay with that. It's about exceptions to the rules. It's about contradiction. It's about uncertainty.
And yet traders left and right want to make it simple. They want to reduce it to a few simple set-ups to trade with discipline. And yet the market is not simple. The market is all about uncertainty, and complexity, and ambiguity. Simple set-ups could never capture that, and they can never give you a true lasting edge.
So what's the solution? Is the problem in the simple set-ups themselves? No, it's in how they're being used. The bottom line is, every trader needs to learn to READ the markets. This means that simple rules will not do. There has to be a synthesis of different elements (whether they be price action, indicators, inter-market themes or whatever), and real-time interpretation must take place. It has to be all about CONTEXT. Once you can read the markets, and don't fool yourself it is a very complex process, then you can choose to employ "simple" set-ups to enter and exit. But the real work will be in interpreting the market to see when you should use which kind of set-up. Seeing a hammer or whatever near a support means nothing unless you've identified the broader picture and gotten a sense of the kind of tactics you should be using, and what the odds are for different scenarios unfolding.
Now I know you, and most traders do this to a certain extent, but your main focus is on the set-ups. It's not on reading the market from minute to minute, hour to hour, figuring out the odds of it doing this or doing that, adapting dynamically, and thinking of trade ideas from all your observation as the day unfolds. Rather, it's waiting for some simple set-up to pop up and then taking it.
Now is it easier emotionally to have clear set-ups to wait for and trade in this simple manner? Absolutely. But who said 'easy' would make you money. If I've learned anything, it's that the market rewards what is hard to do. It's hard to have ambiguity surrounding your market reads. It's hard being uncertain. It's hard dealing with competing and sometimes conflicting signs. And yet, this is what it's all about. You have to stop trying to avoid this by needing things to be clear cut. And is it hard to be disciplined when there's so much uncertainty about what is the right trade to make? Of course. But instead of trying to avoid the uncertainty by looking for simple set-ups, or some straight-forward method, train your mind to be able to deal with the uncertainty.
As for the learning process of how you go about doing this, it's all about being constantly engaged with the markets, trying to figure things out and learn from experience. For me, for instance, what I did was each and every day take notes in a journal all about market action and what I think it means, and how I should trade, and what is working and what's not. I didn't write a journal describing the trades I took, or what my emotions were during the day. It was all about market action. And it was all my perception and interpretation. Day after day, week after week, making mistakes, wrong calls, being clueless as to what was going on, not knowing how I should trade, not knowing if my views made sense or not, and yet I continued taking notes and learning. Then I would view charts and combinations of historical intraday charts, and I'd note certain behavior. For example, I'd study trend day after trend day and try to notice what they had in common and how I could have picked up on it in real time. Then I'd study range days. Then I'd study a price chart of the ES versus the Advance decline line and see what the relationship was across many different days. Then I'd do the same with the ES and TICK chart. And on and on. Over time, this gave me a feel for the markets, and a certain understanding of how certain days differ and many subtle signs and tells for each type of environment and context.
As for set-ups, I didn't use any predefined ones. I just formed trading ideas and then tried to get in at good trade locations. Even this, which is the art of execution, is quite complicated and not straight forward. I started realizing that in some environments it's best to wait for pullbacks, in others I need to get in at market or I'll be left in the dust. In some markets I can buy low and sell high, in other markets the opposite is in order. And so on.
I became consistently profitable in a timeframe of a few months by doing this. But of course before that I had read 30 or 40 books and so I had all the technical background. I had also worked a lot on my psychology and personal issues. But all of this was in conjunction with a method of learning and trading the markets that was mostly in opposition to what the general wisdom says about simple set-ups and exact rules.
Now of course you might say that everyone has their own style, some discretionary and some not. Absolutely. But even the purely mechanical traders are very adept at reading markets, and are aware of all of the complexity and ambiguity inherent in it. Their system might end up being simple, but it will come about through a very deep and complex understanding of markets. And usually this system will take the market environment (i.e. context) into account. It wont just be simple mindless set-ups.
In the end, all of what I am saying is meaningless unless you come to a personal realization. Take a look at your trading career thus far. Do you truly believe that if you just learn to focus and take all of your set-ups then your equity curve will reverse and you'll be a consistently profitable trader? Why would the world's top institutions spend millions and billions on R&D when a few simple set-ups could make them all of the money. This doesn't mean that to make money you need extremely complex mathematical models. Far from it. What it does mean is that you need extremely complex mental maps that take time and experience to develop, and that will never develop if you spend the whole trading day simply waiting for set-ups to materialize. That just won't cut it.
Right now your learning curve is stagnant because you're not truly studying the markets. Your day is wasted in waiting mode. It's not in observing and absorbing mode. Also, because you fear loss, you aren't willing to experiment. This means that you aren't making mistakes and failing regularly, which is what you need to do to learn quickly.
So to conclude, based on all of the above, my advice to you would be to stop trading and make a mental shift. Realize what you need to do to become successful, and it's definitely not staying on this endlessly unfruitful path being supported by the hope of future profits. You're just running in your place unless you change your focus and your learning method. And if you thought the journey was tough so far, you haven't seen anything yet. Get ready for uncertainty and ambiguity like you've never seen it before. But this shouldn't be scary. It should be exciting, because this is what trading is all about. This is why it's called an ART. And it truly becomes one when you change your focus and your learning process. Then everything, including success, becomes possible. And until then, it'll be a distant dream that keeps appearing to be so close and yet stays so far away.
So you need to re-align with a new thought system and then get on the simulator and trade. Take losses. Make mistakes. Be clueless. Don't be afraid of it. It's okay, that's the only way you'll progress. And trust me, progress you will.
Best of luck to you, and I wish you much success.
Ziad
ChuckJune 29, 2009 at 5:44 PM I re-read Ziad's post again today (and no doubt will re-read it many more > times) because it really makes me think about how I analyze the market > each day and how I fit my own setups inside a discretionary plan that has to take into account all the "reads" the market is giving, or at least how I interpret those reads. Ziad must be a brainy guy. I have described the market as being like a maze whereas we show up at the same front entrance every day, and we navigate the maze in the same way (i.e. the same timeframes and indicators every day), and we exit at the same place each day, but every day the walls of the maze are switched around so that the paths are different each day. That's how I see Ziad's premise (a correct premise I believe). We enter the maze each day with the same ability to turn right or left, but unless we see the bigger picture and learn to understand and "get a grip on it" on the bigger view mentally,the turns will lead us to dead ends. Maybe that's confusing but executing our setups without being able to interpret the bigger picture "good enough" will lead to frustration and a lot of "what the hell is going wrong?" frustration.
I'm glad you liked the post Chuck. I felt I had to write it because I know how bad I wanted to succeed at trading when I first started out and how I searched for every inkling of advice I could get. So when I have the chance to offer timely advice I always have to take that opportunity.
And since we're on the subject, I'll share a couple more things with you. Every day I psych myself up before the trading day and during it so that I can have that killer mentality needed to have peak performance in trading. One thing I read every day is something that I wrote to remind myself what trading is all about and where my focus should be. I wrote it because whenever I faced adversity and had ups and downs it always demotivated me and knocked the wind out of my sails temporarily. But I realized that to perform at a world class level I couldn't let that happen. So I wrote the following, and I read it every day at least once or twice:
"It’s not meant to be easy to do all of this; in fact it’s meant to be very hard. If it were easy anyone could do it. Almost everyone knows what it takes; few can actually do it consistently. That's the challenge. When adversity strikes even when you're doing the right things, it’s not unfortunate because greatness is not just about doing the right things, but about doing them even when they cause pain and discomfort- weathering the tough times is the inherent prerequisite for being great. Adversity is built into the game and therefore it’s not an unfortunate set-back that is keeping you from your potential; rather your potential is cut very short without being able to deal well with adversity. So expect great results long-term, but adversity and ups and downs short-term. It’s got to always be about doing the long-term beneficial, not the short-term pleasurable. And we don’t deviate from that, no matter the pressure. And we relish the opportunity to be mentally tough when adversity strikes when so many would wilt and when it feels so unnatural to be optimistic and confident. That is the real goal and priority. Now keep conditioning- constantly reprocess and replace any thoughts that aren’t in line with all of this. It will take a great commitment to unlearn old thinking patterns and instill a new way of thinking to the point of habit. And you can do it."
Reading this reminds me that I'm not a victim of circumstances. That adversity isn't some external factor sabotaging my results. It's part of the game. In fact, it's what the game is all about! You have to learn to relish the opportunity to remain poised when losses hit or when you make mistakes. Take pride in it and make it your main focus. Love trading's inherent difficulties because the ability to handle them is what will truly set you apart. And always remember: this is a game of hits, losses, and misses. Those that can take them best ARE the best.
I wish you all the best in your trading.
Ziad
Credits: http://www.eminiplayer.com/2009/06/learning-to-become-successful-trader.html
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Forex Orders. FX option expiries for Tuesday November 10 at the 10am NY cut; FX option expiries for Monday November 09 at the 10am NY cut; FX option expiries for Friday November 6 at the 10am NY cut In theory, lower rates decrease the value of a country's currency, suppressing the yield available, and making it less attractive to foreign investment and for foreign exchange traders to hold. Note: The bid price will always be smaller than the ask price. Remember from the lesson on Forex currency pairs that the base currency is the one in front while the quote currency is the second. So using the example of EURUSD, the Euro is the base currency and the US Dollar is the quote currency. The basics of forex quotes In some respects, the end goal in forex is the same as for stocks. Buy low and sell high. However, when investing in stocks, the price movement is absolute. In general, the price change in one stock is independent to that of another stock. Currency movements don’t work quite the same way. A currency’s strength or weakness is determined by its supply and demand ... Australian PM uses "meaningless" slogan from U.S. political satire Veep By Byron Kaye SYDNEY, March 23 (Reuters) - Australia's looming election campaign entered the world of the hit U.S. political satire "Veep" when the country's prime minister was caught using a meaningless slogan from the television show. Forex Quotes. General concept. In contrast to the usual designation of the price, Forex quotes, it is not so much the price of a particular product, as a reflection of the value of one type of currency relative to another. The instruments presented on the Forex market trading platforms, in the part of it that involves trading in monetary units, are designated as currency pairs. For example ... Jun 11, 2018 - Find out more about An Old Wall Street Saying Quote. Like the quote? Share it with your friends on social medias.

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Caring 4 You NCLEX Tutoring - YouTube

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